A new report done by the Texas Education Agency and the Department of Family and Protective Services recommends Texas limit its pre-kindergarten classroom sizes to 22 students. The report said most pre-K programs statewide already have 22 students or less, but an estimated 13 to 16-percent of those classrooms in the study exceed the suggested limit.

The report also found pre-K classrooms with an 11:1 student-to-teacher ratio or less preformed the best. The current average of student-to-teacher ratio in Texas pre-K classrooms is 12:1.

Results of this study were determined through classroom observations, data voluntarily reported by 18-percent of Texas school districts from the 2014-2015 school year, and a review of national research on pre-K quality.

Stephanie Ruben, CEO of Texans Care for Children, said her group “wholeheartedly” agrees with the report.

“Pre-K is a proven strategy to help children succeed in school and provide a great return on investment for taxpayers, but only if class sizes and teacher-student ratios are manageable and teachers can effectively engage their students,” said Ruben. “During the next legislative session our state lawmakers should build on HB 4 and establish these quality standards for all pre-K classes.”

You can read the full statement from Ruben’s organization here.

The legislature had the TEA and DFPS look into pre-K class sizes, as part of the state’s sweeping 2015 pre-K initiative under House Bill 4. Under the legislation, Texas Governor Greg Abbott had pledged districts get up to $1,500 per student, if they put into place stricter pre-K standards. However, qualifying districts currently only receive $734 per pupil.