Jerry Patterson

Capital Tonight: Land commissioner details oil spill containment efforts

The clock is counting down for those who haven’t already tried to enroll for health insurance. White House officials say more than six million Americans have signed up under the Affordable Care Act, marking a milestone for the Obama administration heading into the March 31 deadline.

In Thursday’s Capital Tonight, we looked at a marathon effort to get people signed up in East Austin over the span of 36 hours, non-stop.

DEADLINE DELAY

Of course, federal officials have since announced a major exception to the original deadline —one that has critics of the law fuming. Our Capital Commentators explored the political fallout from the latest delay, and they reacted to a new federal court ruling that upholds the abortion restrictions passed last summer.

OIL SPILL UPDATE

Crews on the coast are moving quickly to stop the spread of a massive oil spill in Galveston Bay. Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson joined us with the latest on how his agency is helping coordinate the response.

Capital Tonight: Patterson sounds off after primary loss

Whole Woman’s Health announced it is closing clinics in McAllen and Beaumont, due to restrictions placed on the facilities by an omnibus bill passed last session. Ten other clinics across the state have already closed since the law took effect.

In Thursday’s Capital Tonight, we heard from both sides of the abortion debate about what to expect heading into September, when a new portion of the law could lead to more closures.

FIRING BACK

He might be out of the race for lieutenant governor, but Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson has no plans to fade away quietly. He joined us for a one-on-one interview about his campaign, the runoff race, and his potential successor in the General Land Office, George P. Bush.

PRIMARY POST-MORTEM

Plus, Democratic strategist Harold Cook and Republican strategist Ted Delisi weighed in on the stories that got overlooked on election night.

Jerry Patterson earns Ron Paul endorsement

Jerry Patterson, a Republican candidate for lieutenant governor, is boasting an endorsement from former Rep. Ron Paul today. Paul, who also ran for president in 2012, retired from the U.S. House of Representatives last year. Paul served several terms in Congress over the last few decades and has earned a reputation as a staunch conservative and self-proclaimed “defender of liberty.”

In a statement, Paul said:

“Jerry has served Texas well as Land Commissioner. I am now proud to endorse his campaign for Lieutenant Governor. I know Jerry will fight for limited government and more personal liberties. We have a federal government that is out of control, spends too much, borrows too much, taxes too much and continues to infringe on the constitution and states’ rights. This current administration has even gone so far as to sue states they disagree with. We need people in state governments that are willing to stand up to the federal government and say, ‘Enough is Enough.’”

Patterson said he’s honored to receive Dr. Paul’s endorsement. “We are both well-known for never compromising core values and for sticking to our principles in the pursuit of liberty,” he said. “For over 30 years, I have known and talked with Dr. Paul about our shared belief that our country needs a dramatic reduction in the size of government and a return to constitutional principles and I am very grateful for his support.”

Patterson will face Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst, Sen. Dan Patrick and Agriculture Commissioner Todd Staples in the March GOP primary. The winner will likely face Democrat Leticia Van de Putte in November’s general election.

 

Capital Tonight: More fallout from cancer research funding scandal

A Travis County grand jury has indicted a former executive of the state’s embattled cancer-fighting agency, known as CPRIT. Jerald Cobbs is charged with withholding information and securing execution of a document by deception, a first degree felony.

The fallout from Cobbs’ involvement in improperly awarding an $11 million grant to a company now known as Peloton Therapeutics could go beyond criminal charges, though. In Friday’s Capital Tonight, we looked at whether the state’s top officeholders could face political repercussions as they vie for higher office.

REPORTER ROUNDTABLE

The online exchange tied to the Affordable Care Act got a shot in the arm this week, but state leaders are already eyeing new complications stemming from the law. Our reporter roundtable weighed in on that and other developments.

CANDIDATE CONVERSATION

Plus, we continued our series of conversations with the Republican candidates for lieutenant governor. Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson joined us to talk about gun rights, border security and more.

Patrick launches second statewide television ad

Lieutenant governor candidate Sen. Dan Patrick on Wednesday launched his second statewide television ad. The new 30-second spot targets incumbent Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst and criticizes his budget leadership during the last legislative session.

“The only thing you need to know about the lieutenant governor’s current budget is that every Democrat praised and voted for it,” Patrick said. “As a conservative Republican, I didn’t.”

This is Patrick’s second television ad to hit the airwaves. His last ad, which proclaimed he was the only candidate to “oppose in-state tuition for illegal immigrants,” prompted outcry from his opponents who argued the claim was untrue and produced a “false” rating from PolitiFact Texas.

Patrick is one of four Republicans on the GOP primary ballot. He faces Dewhurst, Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson and Agriculture Commissioner Todd Staples.

Dewhurst ad: ‘Texas takes the cake’

Lieutenant Governor candidate David Dewhurst is out with a new ad today, touting Texas’ job creation record.

“Over the past 10 years, Texas has added more private sector jobs than any other state,” Dewhurst says in the voice over. “If Texas was a cake, and one candle represented 10,000 private sector jobs, Texas would look like this.”

Dewhurst faces three challengers in the Republican primary. He’ll be up against Sen. Dan Patrick, Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson and Agriculture Commissioner Todd Staples. No Democrats entered the race yet, although Sen. Leticia Van de Putte has said she is contemplating a run.

Patterson ad takes aim at Dewhurst, Patrick

Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson is making his case as an outsider in the race for lieutenant governor.

In a new ad, entitled “Washington West,” Patterson paints the current Senate leadership as “soft” and unable to get things done. He cites the delayed vote on a controversial abortion bill that followed Sen. Wendy Davis’ filibuster back in June, blaming Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst and Sen. Dan Patrick for letting an “unruly mob” of demonstrators take control.

“That might happen in Wisconsin or Michigan, but not in Texas,” Patterson says in the ad.

Patterson has served as head of the General Land Office since 2002, and was a state Senator for six years until 1999. He faces incumbent Lt. Gov. Dewhurst, Sen. Patrick and current Agriculture Commissioner Todd Staples in a primary race for the state’s second highest political office.

 

 

Dewhurst campaign releases ‘defender of the pre-born’ video

The lieutenant governor hasn’t held any official reelection campaign events, but a new video released by his campaign team appears to get it started for him.

Posted by the TeamDewhurst account Tuesday, the video shows Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst in the days leading up to the passage of House Bill 2, which imposes tough, new restrictions on abortion providers. The bill was forced into a second special session after Dewhurst failed to get it passed before a midnight deadline at the end of June. The second time around, thousands of demonstrators, both for and against the bill, gathered at the Capitol. Over dramatic music, the video shows Dewhurst promising to respect the opposition’s First Amendment rights while guaranteeing to supporters that the bill would pass.

The video is titled “Dewhurst: Defender of the Pre-Born.”

The ad was paid for by the David Dewhurst Committee, which campaign finance reports show has just over $1.7 million in cash on hand. That puts Dewhurst in third place in the field of declared candidates for lieutenant governor. The numbers show Agriculture Commissioner Todd Staples with a strong head start at $3 million. Sen. Dan Patrick, who has strongly criticized Dewhurst for his handling of the bill during the first special session, holds $2.1 milllion. Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson’s campaign has $1.3 million.

Updated: First campaign finance figures released in crowded lieutenant governor race

Updated to add Sen. Dan Patrick’s campaign announcement

Sen. Dan Patrick is reporting his campaign raised $100,000 in the days following his announcement for lieutenant governor, giving him $2.1 million in cash on hand. Patrick, who is the chair of the Senate Education Committee, announced his intention to run for the state’s number two office on June 27.

“I am humbled by the support my campaign has generated among Texans since announcing for Lieutenant Governor on June 27th, though my primary focus in the last few weeks has been on the special session and passing important pro-life legislation,” Patrick said.

Original story:

We’re getting our first glimpse into the financial standing of the candidates running for lieutenant governor. Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson announced Monday his campaign raised $417,000 in the last two weeks. That brings his total cash on hand to $1.3 million.

Patterson is part of a crowded field of Republican candidates vying for the state’s number-two spot. He faces Agriculture Commissioner Todd Staples and Senator Dan Patrick. Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst told Capital Tonight he was also planning to run again, although he has not formally launched a reelection campaign.

The crowded field sets the stage for a 2014 runoff election. Patterson says he’ll likely need $3 million more to make it that far.

Under Texas law, elected officials are not allowed to fundraise until 20 days after the end of the regular legislative session, essentially giving them two weeks to raise cash ahead of today’s reporting deadline. Patterson called his haul between June 17-30 “pretty strong for 13 days of work”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Capital Tonight: Public education issues still unresolved

Back to School

More questions are being raised in about the state’s school funding system.

Players from both sides of the school finance lawsuit were back in court Wednesday in an effort to get District Judge John Dietz to admit public education changes passed out of the 83rd Legislature as evidence. But many of those changes are still up in the air, pending Gov. Rick Perry’s signature — or his veto pen.

Campus Construction

As the special session creeps slowly along, some lawmakers are holding out hope that their legislation will make it on the call.

One push in particular is gaining a lot of attention. Legislation that would have approved about $2.5 billion in tuition revenue bonds fell through in the final hours of the regular session, but backers of the bills are hopeful it will be considered during the special session.

Candidate Perspective

Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson stopped by the studio to give his take on the regular session as a candidate for Lieutenant Governor. Click the logo below to see the full interview.