Hutchison responds to SCOTUS Health Care ruling

Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison released this statement in response to today’s Supreme Court Health Care law decision:

“The Supreme Court has declared the health care law constitutional, but that doesn’t make it good policy. In fact, the majority said it was not ruling on fairness or wisdom of health care policy, but instead on the power of Congress to levy taxes.

“The court’s ruling confirms the president’s health care law is nothing more than a massive tax on the American people.

“When the health care law is fully implemented, most Americans won’t be able to keep the coverage they have now. Their health insurance coverage choices will be decided in Washington, D.C., and there will also be new regulations to disrupt the doctor-patient relationship. $500 billion will be cut from Medicare to pay for full implementation of the health care law, plus $500 billion in higher taxes on individual Americans and businesses.

“From the start, Americans have had deep misgivings about government taking over health care, and these concerns have grown as they’ve learned more about how they will be affected. The Supreme Court’s ruling changes none of this. Americans will have an opportunity to do something about this on Election Day in November.”

Republican U.S. Senate candidates respond to SCOTUS immigration decision

Both Republican candidates for the U.S. Senate agree it is time for the federal government to focus on securing the border, following the Supreme Court’s split decision on the Arizona immigration law.

Ted Cruz used the decision as an opportunity to attack opponent David Dewhurst on the failed sanctuary city ban from the last legislative session.


“The federal government is utterly failing to secure our borders. When Arizona stepped in to address out-of-control illegal immigration, liberal groups attacked Arizona and the Obama Administration sued the State. Rather than actually enforce our Nation’s immigration laws—which is the President’s explicit constitutional obligation—President Obama instead asked the Supreme Court to strike down Arizona’s law. Today, the Supreme Court upheld the central provision of the Arizona law. Although the Court unfortunately struck down other provisions of the Arizona law, the Court held that there is no barrier in federal law to States’ requiring local law enforcement to check on the immigration status of those criminally detained," Ted Cruz said in a statement Monday afternoon. "This makes clear that sanctuary cities exist only because of state and local decision-making; it highlights that we have sanctuary cities in Texas only because Lt. Gov. Dewhurst killed the bill that would have ended sanctuary cities. Had the Texas Legislature passed that bill—had Lt. Governor Dewhurst not run from the fight and prevented its passage—then today’s decision would have upheld that Texas law as well.”

Dewhurst also called for the federal government to secure the border, and criticized any legislation that provides a pathway to citizenship for illegal immigrants.


"The Supreme Court’s partial ruling on the Arizona immigration law only spotlights the abject failure of the federal government to secure the border. Today’s decision reinforces the need for conservatives in Congress to once and for all quit talking and secure the border," Dewhurst said in a statement Monday morning. "The first step is triple the size of the Border Patrol and authorize them to fight back. Congress must make states and local communities partners in securing the border, allowing them the tools necessary to enforce the laws of our Nation. Any legislation that provides a pathway to citizenship for illegal aliens must be dead on arrival, and we must look at all the tools in our arsenal to address the influx of illegal immigrants, the threat of narco-terrorists and drug cartels.”

High court rejects parts of Arizona immigration law

The Supreme Court struck down several provisions of Arizona’s controversial immigration law Monday, however police will be allowed to ask suspects to prove their immigration status if they look like they could be illegal immigrants. People won’t be arrested for minor immigration charges.

Read more:

Read the full slip opinion of the case by clicking here.

Justices said the "show me your papers" provision could still be subject to additional legal challenges.

President Obama said he is "pleased" with the decision but concerned about the remaining provision.

"What this decision makes unmistakably clear is that Congress must act on comprehensive immigration reform. A patchwork of state laws is not a solution to our broken immigration system – it’s part of the problem. At the same time, I remain concerned about the practical impact of the remaining provision of the Arizona law that requires local law enforcement officials to check the immigration status of anyone they even suspect to be here illegally. I agree with the Court that individuals cannot be detained solely to verify their immigration status. No American should ever live under a cloud of suspicion just because of what they look like. Going forward, we must ensure that Arizona law enforcement officials do not enforce this law in a manner that undermines the civil rights of Americans, as the Court’s decision recognizes."

Mitt Romney released a statement shortly after the decision. Romney said the decision shows the need for bipartisan immigration reform.

“Today’s decision underscores the need for a President who will lead on this critical issue and work in a bipartisan fashion to pursue a national immigration strategy. President Obama has failed to provide any leadership on immigration. This represents yet another broken promise by this President. I believe that each state has the duty–and the right–to secure our borders and preserve the rule of law, particularly when the federal government has failed to meet its responsibilities. As Candidate Obama, he promised to present an immigration plan during his first year in office. But 4 years later, we are still waiting.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Perry responds to SCOTUS immigration opinion

Gov. Rick Perry issued this response to the US Supreme Court’s ruling on Arizona’s controversial immigration law:

“Today’s decision by the Supreme Court to uphold Arizona’s right to check the legal status of individuals within its borders is a victory not only for the people of Arizona, but for the rule of law. No state should be held hostage to a federal government that refuses to enforce the laws of the land.

“But today’s ruling is one step forward and two steps back – simply not good enough. It is bad enough that the Obama administration picks and chooses which laws it wishes to enforce, but for the United States Supreme Court to deprive states of some of those powers that are, in the words of Justice Scalia, ‘the defining characteristic[s] of sovereignty,’ is insulting to the Constitution and our right to govern ourselves.

“The people of Arizona took action consistent with federal law and in direct response to the failure of this administration to secure our nation’s borders. The absence of federal action on immigration enforcement directly spoils the integrity of our nation’s laws.”

Dewhurst launches first runoff TV ad

With the Texas primary runoff election a little more than a month away, the post-primary political ad lull is about to end.

The US Senate race has been contentious from the beginning, with Ted Cruz accusing Lt. Gov. Dewhurst of pandering to the Republican establishment, and Dewhurst attacking Cruz as a Washington DC insider.

Now, the TV ad fight is renewed. Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst released his first of the runoff season, today. Much like his early spots, the ad takes aim at what Dewhurst calls Cruz’s legal "representation of a Chinese company that killed American jobs and stole intellectual property from an American businessman."

You can watch the ad, here:

Rep. Doggett criticizes Holder contempt vote

U.S. Rep. Lloyd Doggett is criticizing a House committee vote to hold U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder in contempt, for his refusal to hand over documents related to the ‘Fast and Furious’ operation.

He released this statement today:

“Families along I-35 have plenty of contempt for Congress unresponsive because of politically-motivated distractions like today’s contempt vote. While any executive privilege should be construed narrowly, this Committee went too fast and folks have reason to be furious that this Republican Congress is ignoring real concerns, like greater economic opportunity, more affordable healthcare, and stronger public education.”


Our Washington D.C. bureau spoke with Doggett as well as Rep. Blake Farenthold, who was on the House committee that recommended the contempt charges. We’ll hear from both Congressmen on YNN, later this evening.

Obama invokes executive privilege to keep ‘Fast and Furious’ documents secret

Republicans are taking aim at President Obama, after the White House invoked executive privilege; refusing to turn over documents related to the so-called ‘Fast and Furious’ scandal.

The House Oversight Committee had requested the documents, before it decides if Attorney General Eric Holder should face contempt charges related to the scandal.

Republicans have questioned what Holder knew about the passing of illegally purchased weapons across the border to Mexico.

Last week, Sen. John Cornyn called for Holder’s resignation. Today, he released this statement:

“The Attorney General and now the President have refused to turn over documents to investigators and failed to hold anyone accountable for his department’s mishandling of Fast and Furious, which lead to the death of Brian Terry.

“Today’s vote could have been avoided, but the Attorney General and President Obama’s insistence on stonewalling left no other option.”


In a letter to the president, Holder said that releasing the internal documents would have damaging consequences. The White House, meanwhile, is accusing House Republicans of engaging in a "politically motivated, taxpayer-funded election-year fishing expedition.”

Ron Paul still raking in campaign cash

Rep. Ron Paul isn’t actively campaigning for president and he admits he won’t be his party’s nominee. But that isn’t stopping campaign contributions from rolling in. Politico is reporting that Paul raised $1.78 million in the month of May. That left the Texas Republican with more than $3 million in the bank.

Meanwhile, Paul supporters are sure to make their mark on the Republican National Convention in August. The Paul campaign announced last week that he’ll stand with his 200 delegates at a rally in Tampa on Sunday, the 26th; a day before the official RNC commences.

In an email, Paul said, "The goal of this rally is to kick off the week for our delegates, set the proper respectful and positive tone, and prove to the GOP establishment that you and I are the future of the Republican Party – and that we stand behind our beliefs 100%."

Third Emerging Technology Fund recipient goes bankrupt



Another company awarded money from Gov. Rick Perry’s Emerging Technology Fund filed for bankruptcy last month.

Nano-Tailor’s CEO says the company folded because the state did not fully invest up to $1.25 million.

In 2010, Nano-Tailor received $250,000 in taxpayer money. The company’s CEO says it could not meet performance requirements added to the original contract.

Two other tech fund recipients filed for bankruptcy in 2010.

Nano-Tailor’s filing brings the total amount of failed investments to $2.5 million.

Perry launched the fund in 2005. Since then, it has awarded $370 million to more than 100 companies.

Health and Human Services Commissioner to retire



Courtesy: Texas Health and Human Services


Texas Health and Human Services Executive Commissioner Tom Suehs announced Thursday he’ll retire at the end of August. He headed the HHSC for three years.

“Thank you for the opportunity to serve our great state in a position that touches the lives of every Texan,” Suehs wrote in a letter to the Governor, according to a news release. “It has truly been an honor and a privilege.”

Suehs was appointed by Perry in 2009. He’s worked in state government for 26 years.

“In his more than 25 years of dedicated service to the people of Texas, Tom Suehs has worked tirelessly to improve the health and wellbeing of families across the state," Gov. Perry said in a statement. "During his tenure as Texas Health and Human Services executive commissioner, Tom helped steer the health and human services enterprise through significant and much-needed reforms, ensuring our taxpayer dollars are used effectively and efficiently to help our most vulnerable Texans."

Suehs’ announcement comes just weeks after state Medicaid director Billy Milwee announced he would step down.